Testosterone Therapy-Male Infertility

Testosterone Therapy-Male Infertility

image_pdfimage_print

Testosterone Therapy-Male Infertility

Many men are prescribed testosterone for a variety of reasons. Low testosterone levels (Low T) with no symptoms, general symptoms of low energy and feeling  tiered and sexual symptoms, among others. Approximately 2.5 million men are prescribed testosterone each year in The US, mostly with no proper testing. Testosterone is only approved by FDA for low testosterone associated with specific diseases affecting testicular function.  The FDA recently issued a safety communication cautioning the use of testosterone replacement for low testosterone levels and requiring labeling change to inform men of a possible increase in side effects.

From the fertility standpoint, there is no role for testosterone treatment, that could be detrimental. There is also no proven role for other medical treatment as clomid, letrozole, nolvadex, hCG and others in enhancing fertility in the vast majority of men

Effects of testosterone on male fertility

When men are prescribed testosterone, sperm production slows down significantly and may completely stop. Many of them, no sperm can be found in the ejaculate (azospermia). Testosterone therapy can markedly lower the ability of men to father children. Testosterone inhibits a key master gland hormone (FSH) that is required to stimulate spermatogenesis (making sperm). The specific effects of testosterone on sperm count are unpredictable. In some men sperm count drops to zero even after a short use of testosterone.

Interestingly, when testosterone is stopped some men but definitely not all of them recover sperm production, commonly in one to six months. The extent of the recovery of sperm count is also unpredictable. The recovery of sperm count maybe limited requiring fertility treatment for conception to take place. A short course of testosterone can lead to a low sperm count for a very long time.

What can be done about low sperm count related to testosterone treatment

In addition to evaluation of female factors especially ovarian reserve, always a priority, men on testosterone and showing low sperm count should be advised to

1. Stop testosterone administration immediately

2. Repeat sperm analysis in 2 months. Sperm analysis should be performed in a facility that can perform diligent search for even very few sperm and  can freeze sperm. If sperm is found in the ejaculate it should be cryopreserved immediately. If no sperm is found then sperm analysis should be repeated in another 2 months. The wait for recovery cannot be indefinite because of further deterioration of ovarian reserve in female partner with time.

3. Depending on the extent of recovery sperm can be utilized to promote conception. If sperm count recover close to 10 million moving sperm, natural conception can take place. Also sperm can be used for IUI, if needed. If the number of motile sperm is significantly lower, IVF is required, sometimes with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI).

4. If still no sperm were found after repeat analysis, TESE (testicular sperm extraction) can be attempted. A male reproductive urologist can perform diligent search for areas of spermatogenesis in the testes through repeat minute biopsy and searching under the microscope.

From the preventive aspect, avoid testosterone treatment if you intend to father children in the future. Know that there are very few solid indications for testosterone. If testosterone treatment is inevitable, consider pretreatment sperm freezing. Use gel preparation preferential to injection as they are not stored for a long time in the body.

Testosterone treatment is a preventable cause for infertility in males and could be detrimental to future fertility.

Testosterone Therapy-Male Infertility by
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail